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The Hidden Costs of Quick Fixes: The Dangers of Punishment Collars and Forceful Dog Training



As dog guardians, we all want our loyal companions to be well-behaved and happy. But when our dogs exhibit undesirable behaviour, we may be tempted to resort to quick fixes like punishment collars or trainers who use forceful techniques.


However, these methods come at a high cost to both the dog and their guardians. In this article, we will explore why using punishment collars and forceful dog training can lead to negative consequences that can impact the relationship between the dog and their guardian.


The Negative Consequences of Punishment Collars


Punishment collars use unpleasant and sometimes painful consequences to change dog behaviour. While these collars may provide a quick fix to a behaviour problem, they can cause physical and emotional harm to the dog. They must be painful and traumatic for dogs for them to work, leading to fear, anxiety, and aggression or stress and suppression. Moreover, these collars erode the trust between the dog and their guardian, leading to even more problems in the future.


The Risks of Forceful Dog Training


Trainers who use forceful techniques to train dogs may also provide a quick fix to behaviour problems. However, these methods rely on using aversive techniques like shouting, physical punishment, and dominance-based training. Not only can these techniques cause physical and emotional harm to the dog, but they also fail to address the root cause of the behavior issue. This can lead to a breakdown in the bond between the dog and their guardian, making it more difficult to correct behavior problems in the long term.


The High Costs of Quick Fixes


In addition to the negative consequences of punishment collars and forceful dog training, these quick fixes can also come at a high cost to the guardian. Repairing the trust between the dog and their guardian after using these techniques can be time-consuming and may require even more effort in the long run.


In summary, quick fixes like punishment collars and forceful dog training may seem like an easy solution to behavior problems, but they come at a high cost to both the dog and their guardian. Positive reinforcement training is a better alternative that promotes trust, understanding, and a lasting bond between the dog and their guardian. As responsible dog guardians, it is important to prioritise our dogs' well-being and use humane training methods that address the root cause of the behavior issue.


How to Become a Dog Trainer


If you're interested in becoming a professional dog trainer and also want to learn more about canine welfare, emotions, and ethics, consider signing up for the International School for Canine Psychology and Behaviour (ISCP) level 4 dog training course. Our comprehensive course covers a range of topics, including dog behaviour, health, nutrition, and training. We believe in a holistic approach to dog training, which considers the dog's emotional state and overall well-being. Our course is perfect for anyone who wants to gain a deeper understanding of dogs and learn how to train them effectively, compassionately, and ethically.


Visit our website to learn more and sign up for the ISCP course today!



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1 Comment


Johnny Logan
Johnny Logan
Oct 09, 2023

"They must be painful and traumatic for dogs for them to work" - this is completely false, this is opinion only, not research data backed, nor is it backed by psychological peer reviewed research


"these methods rely on using aversive techniques like shouting, physical punishment, and dominance-based training." this is again uninformed opinion with over grandiose language to influence agreement on opinion. The psychological definition of 'aversive' is "unpleasant stimuli that leads to reduction of behaviour.


This article is full of emotive language and lumps "extreme force" with aversive. These are not equal concepts. the author demonstrates a complete lack of comprehensive behaviour training and neuroplasticity and stress innoculation.


I rate this 0 stars as poorly researched, in fact no…

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